Job Interview Do’s and Don’ts for Lynnwood Careers

Job Interview Do’s:

Preparing for a job interview is essential to making a good impression. Employ these handy job interview techniques to win over your interviewer:

  • Plan to arrive on time or a few minutes early. Late arrival for a job interview is never excusable.
  • Greet the interviewer by their first name.
  • Wait until you are offered a chair before sitting. Sit upright and always look alert and interested. Be a good listener as well as a good talker. Smile!
  • Maintain eye contact.
  • Follow the interviewer’s leads but try to get them to describe the position and duties early in the interview so you can relate your background and skills to the position.
  • Make sure you convey your good points factually and sincerely. Keep in mind that you alone can sell yourself to an interviewer. Make them realize why they need you in their organization.
  • Always conduct yourself as if you are determined to get the job. Never close the door on an opportunity. It is better to be free to choose from a number of jobs rather than only one.

Job Interview Don’ts:

  • Answer questions with a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Share things about yourself relating to the position.
  • Lie. Always answer questions truthfully, frankly and as concisely as possible.
  • Ever make derogatory remarks about your present or former employers, colleagues or companies.
  • ‘Over-answer’ questions. The interviewer may steer the conversation into politics or economics. It is best to answer the questions honestly, saying no more than is necessary.
  • Let your discouragement show. If you get the impression the interview is not going well and you have already been rejected, don’t show discouragement or alarm. Occasionally an interviewer who is genuinely interested in you may seem to discourage you in order to test your reaction.
  • Ask about salary, bonuses or holidays at the first interview – unless you are positive the employer is interested in hiring you and raises the issue first. However, know your market value and be prepared to specify your required salary or range.

Job Search Hacks for finding great jobs in Redmond

Use Google Alerts

The best way to guarantee that you are tailoring and targeting your interview information for a specific company is to make sure you’re keeping up on all their news and information.  Using a service like Google Alerts can save you precious time by doing the digging for you!  Signing up with Google Alerts is quick and easy and once you’re all done, you’ll start getting email alerts any time a news story appears for whatever specific terms you’ve set up.  With just a few clicks of your mouse and a little bit of information from you, news stories and current events related to the companies you select are automatically delivered to your email box.  This is one job interview tip that will keep you abreast of all of the important things that are affecting your industry and the company you are interviewing with.

Identify a Problem and Fix It

In many cases, a company will be hiring for a position in order to solve a problem or remedy an issue they have been facing. By studying the job description you can often tell if this is the case for the position you are interviewing for. If this is the case, take this opportunity to prepare a one-page proposal that outlines how you would solve the problem that the company is facing… and be specific! Even if they aren’t looking for you to solve the problem in the interview, they will be impressed that you took the initiative and more importantly, that as a hire, you will bring a lot of value to their organization.

Follow Up! (Before You Leave the Interview)

Make sure you follow up before you even leave the interview. At the end of your interview, make sure to reinforce the idea that you’re interested in the job. Wrap up with a phrase like “I’m really looking forward to an opportunity to be a part of such a dynamic company and I really hope you select me.”

Follow up that statement with a few questions about the next steps you should expect.

Not only are you gathering what could be valuable prep information, it’s showing them that you’re eager to continue on and do whatever it takes to get to the subsequent round. If the interviewer is vague, it’s a great opportunity to ask them what they’re vague about and help clarify any questions they might have that weren’t answered in the interview. Now is also the time to get a clear idea of the time table they have. When will selected applicants be asked back for subsequent interviews or to meet other people? Do they have a specific date in mind that they’d like to have the position filled by?

Asking questions like these reinforce the idea that you’re enthusiastic about the job…and it lets you know what their schedule is so you’re not blindly waiting.

Seattle Hobbies that could land you a job

In a competitive workplace, your resume needs to stand out enough to get you through the front door.  So once you’ve polished up your skills and experience, put that “Hobbies” line on your resume to work for you. Here are a few extracurricular interests that can highlight admirable job skills.

Rock Climbing

What it shows: Decisiveness, problem solving, and interpersonal skills
Adrenaline-pumping activities like rock climbing and whitewater rafting say a lot about personality — and look especially good for candidates pursuing jobs that involve heavy decision making and leadership skills. If you’re trying to show that you can make quick decisions under heavy pressure, support those claims with evidence.

Launching a Club

What it shows: Initiative, management skills, and passion

You can skip listing most club memberships, say career experts. But if you actually founded a local juggling (or running, hiking, ukulele playing, etc.) club, be sure to include it — because it shows impressive initiative and management skills.

Seattle recruiters look for any pursuit in achieving a level of excellence. Of course, starting a club just because you think it will look good on your resume isn’t enough. People will see right through that, You have to have a passion for it, and pursue it at a high level — that’s the trick.”

Hosting Online Discussions

What it shows: Leadership, reliability, and a strong understanding of social media

Leading regular Twitter chats (or other online discussion groups) combines several talents that recruiters are on the lookout for: organizational, networking, and technical skills, as well as the ability to develop and maintain a social media following. It shows genuine passion and leadership and excellence; those are skills that hiring managers love.”

Volunteering Your Talents

What it shows: Practical skills, generosity, and confidence

Have you done any volunteer work that is related to your profession? Applying your career skills for the greater good can say a lot to Seattle hiring managers.

“Examples would be like managing financials or financial records for a charitable organization, overseeing an event, production or program, or establishing or directing a fundraiser. This type of volunteer work can help demonstrate your skills, experience, or expertise, as well as your commitment to community.

Job Search Strategies for Bellevue

Be Patient and Strategic, Not Impulsive and Desperate

Heading into your job search without clear intentions is like going grocery shopping parched and famished – and, as we all know, nothing good ever comes from shopping on an empty stomach. (If you don’t know, now you know.) Instead, first construct a plan that incorporates your skills, your expectations, and your short- and long-term career goals.

Be sure to take a day or two mapping out a career plan that reflects what you’re good at and where you want to be. This is the time to be realistic about your qualifications, experience, and future. By doing so, you are less likely to make the all-too-common mistake of being a desperate, needy candidate who will take any old job that’s thrown his way. Instead, focus on finding a career that aligns with your wants and needs, both professionally and personally, and head into your job hunt with the mentality that you’re searching for a dream career, not a paycheck.

Focus on Quality Over Quantity

Feeding off of the whole “don’t be desperate and impulsive” thing, it’s crucial to value quality over quantity when it comes to finding a lasting and fulfilling career. Far too many candidates make the mistake of assuming that casting a wide net when applying for any and all available jobs is the way to go; however, this mentality couldn’t be more incorrect. Applying to tons of jobs blindly because you figure you’re bound to land one is reckless and a great way to wind up back in the job-hunting world before you know it. It’s easy to fall into the trap of wanting an employer – any employer, really – to call you back for a job interview because any job is better than no job, right? Well, not really.

Sometimes in life, beggars can’t be choosers. Of course, if you’re in a situation where you need to earn a paycheck to keep a roof over your family’s head and food in their bellies, then, by all means, go out and earn a living – there’s no shame in that whatsoever. But focus your long-term plans on building the career you want, and targeting opportunities appropriately.

 

Tough Sales Job Interview Questions Asked in Redmond

“Why do you want to work in sales?”

The biggest mistake you can make when answering this question is to simply say, “Because I like it,” or worse, “Because the money is good.” This doesn’t really tell the interviewer anything they couldn’t have obviously guessed—and it certainly doesn’t help to set you apart from other candidates.

Successfully answer this tough question by focusing on your sales history. Think back to when your passion first began. Was it because of a summer job? Or maybe it started as early as childhood. Briefly illustrate this passion with real-life examples and include a success story, if possible. Then tie it in to why you still want to work in sales. Employers will take note of this longstanding drive and remember your answer because of your personal story.

Bellevue Sample Thank-you letter

This is a sample letter, its just a template please customize to fit your situation

Good afternoon, XYZ,

Thank you for taking the time to speak with me yesterday about the staff writer position with Business News Daily.

It was a pleasure meeting with you, and I truly enjoyed learning more about the role and the company. After our conversation, I am confident that my skills and experiences are a great match for this opportunity.

I am very enthusiastic about the possibility of joining your team and would greatly appreciate a follow-up as you move forward with the hiring process. If you need any further information, please do not hesitate to contact me by email or phone. Thanks again, and I hope to hear from you in the near future.

Best regards,
ABC

Seattle Salary Negotiations

When you’re finally down to the wire on your impending job offer, there will come a time to talk numbers. “That one last conversation — where you negotiate salary — can unnerve even the most savvy job seeker.”

While most employers expect you to come back with a counteroffer, many job candidates avoid the practice and leave money on the table. “You don’t have to be one of them,” she says. “You’d be well served in your career to become comfortable with the process. You get one chance to accept a final compensation package at your company, so be prepared to make a persuasive argument.”

So how do you stay true to your target without alienating the hiring manager or hurting your prospects?

First, to prepare for that discussion, you’ll want to do your research ahead of time and figure out what someone with your experience and skills typically makes in this particular role.

Once you hear their offer and it’s time to negotiate, you should keep those numbers in mind, “but also consider the nature of the first offer and how much bargaining power you think you have,” Taylor says. And think about whether you’re currently under- or overpaid.

As a general rule of thumb, however, it’s usually appropriate to ask for 10% to 20% more than what you’re currently making. 

That means if you’re making $50,000 a year now, you can easily ask for $55,000 to $60,000 without seeming greedy or getting laughed at.

“If the original offer is on the low side of the scale, you have more leverage,” Taylor explains. “If you get an offer for 20% over your current salary, you can still negotiate for more — ask for an additional 5% — but know that you’re already in good stead.”

The bottom line: Do the math (and your research!) beforehand — know what a 10% to 20% pay increase would total, and what the going rate for someone with your skills is — and ask for that amount. Worst case scenario, the employer says “no.”

Redmond Salary Negotiation

Present your value.

Even if you’ve done you’re due diligence in researching salary levels for the position, you might not get what you’re worth unless you can prove that you’re worth it. “In serious salary negotiations, it is all about value proposition, If the company believes your value to be in multiples of your cost, you will have negotiating room. The higher your perceived value, the stronger your negotiating position.” If the employer doesn’t think you have greater than expected value, you will not negotiate more than a token handout.

To convince the hiring manager that your documented, numerical contributions far exceed your total financial package cost, he says you must describe the size of the problems you solve. “This is the heart of your ability to ask for more money. “They can hire anyone for routine tasks, but they mostly judge your value by the level of difficulty of problems you solve. They pay well for those who exceed expectations for performance.”

4 Things you need to know while searching for jobs in Seattle

  1. Find someone to refer you. You are missing out on job opportunities by not identifying someone inside the company to refer you for a job. While job boards are the primary source of hiring, 71 percent of HR professionals surveyed rated employee referrals as the best source for finding candidates, yet only 7 percent of job seekers surveyed viewed referrals as their top source for finding a job.
  2. Invest in learning technical skills. Job seekers self-reported that their top weakness was technical, computer or specialized skills. If this is your weak spot too, do something about it, because a quarter of employers rank these as top skills they are looking for. Take an online course to develop the skills you lack or need. More than 40 percent of job seekers have never invested in online training, but it is one way to improve your confidence and candidacy.
  3. Expect to meet several people during your interviews. It is unlikely you’ll be hired based on one interview. Almost 60 percent of HR professionals said the interview process involves meeting two to three people, and some employers will have you meet with as many as five people during the interview process.
  4.  Highlight these top three skill sets. Communication, adaptability and results-driven are the top skills HR is looking for in candidates. Unfortunately, job seekers miss the mark. While job seekers did list communication skills as a top skill set, they missed the mark in the other top skills they reported, which were leadership and teamwork.

Emerging Job Trends in Seattle and Bellevue

It will be harder for job seekers to land interviews

There are two reasons for this. First, employers are utilizing a more cumbersome applicant screening processes.  Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) require more time to sift through all available information to source the best candidates, using more forms, questionnaires, etc. as part of the screening process.  Second, employers are automating some jobs at the expense of employees.  As a result, job seekers should invest ample time in self-assessment process, in order to understand how their skills and background best fit each targeted position.  Then, effectively communicate their skills and experiences to employers.  A key outcome of this trend, Richards points out, is that résumés and applications must be more meticulously tailored to specific openings, in order to be selected for an interview.