Starting a new job? hit the ground running.

Start early each day. Getting to work early gives employees time to get settled, review what needs to be done for the day and organize their schedule.

Don’t act like you know everything. Just because things were done one way at your old job doesn’t mean that’s how your new employer wants it done. Before suggesting any changes, it is important to first try to do things the way your new employer prefers.

Ask for help. Try to learn as much about how your new company operates as quickly as possible. If you aren’t sure about a task or how it should be completed, ask someone who knows. It’s better to ask for help than to get it wrong. Also, get specific feedback from your boss each week so you know what areas you need to work on and what additional training might be beneficial.

Don’t rock the boat. When first starting, observe the company’s corporate culture and act accordingly. In the beginning, don’t ask for a flexible schedule or more time off. If those are things you’re looking for, discuss those possibilities before accepting the job.

Say “thank you.” It’s important to show your co-workers appreciation when they help you out. Showing gratitude lets your co-workers know that you valued their assistance and will likely lead them to help you again in the future.

Be open to feedback. If someone tells you that things are done a certain way, accept it and move on. Often, people do not mean it as criticism but guidance. Consider their feedback thoughtfully to make improvements rather than taking it personally.

Ask for advice. There is no better way to show people in your office that you value them than by asking what they wish they had known when they were in your shoes. Many people love to talk about themselves, so give them the opportunity to do so.

Tips to survive the Covid Blues

2020 has been an epic year for all the wrong reasons and things are bleak and circumstances have led you to think about a  new career or a new job.

Maintain your focus.

If you’re about to start a new job or career, it’s time to get laser-focused. What type of work do you want to do? What types of projects do you want to work on? Get clear on what your dream career looks like and deprioritize anything that’s not on your goal list.

Do your research.

Thanks to Google (and Bing and Yahoo) job searching resources are at our fingertips! Interested in working at a specific company? Check out Glassdoor to see what employees are saying about it. Get informed–it might even lead you to a new company (or title) you haven’t heard of before.

Remove distractions.

Learning something new or doing research to change careers can be daunting, so always aim to work in environments that allow you to be the most productive.

Learn the fundamentals of the industry.

If you’re making the leap into a completely new field, do your best to learn the basics. Find out what the typical job titles and roles consist of and learn about the types of career path options you could take. Start with the entry level and work your way up to see what it would take to become a manager or director in your respective field.

Tap into your network.

Ready to become a software engineer and know a friend (or a friend of a friend) who is one? Reach out to them! Buy them coffee, find out about their process, dig into what they wish they knew when they got started.  Even if you’ve had three jobs before making the switch, there’s always room to learn more. Worst case, you’ll get some insider info. Best case––they might be the contact that helps you nab your next role.

Upgrade your career during these tough times

Decide on your career goals and how you can achieve them

Decide on your long term career goals, where do you want to be in the next 1, 5 or 10 years? Determine how exactly you can achieve them, what do you need to do to reach your aim? You will most likely need to set small goals in order to create a path to your ultimate goal.

Write your goals down

A Harvard research study as mentioned above also showed that those who wrote down their goals were 3 times more likely to achieve them than those who didn’t. Write your goals down somewhere visible and tick them off when you achieve them.

Be proactive

If you have decided that a new role at a new company is the right route for you then you need to be proactive, start to use job boards and recruiters to help you find that new start.

If you use a recruiter that is specialised to your industry or skill set then they can give you the latest information on your job market. They will also be able to prepare you for upcoming interviews knowing what your potential employer is looking for and give valuable feedback.

At CareerPaths NW we specialize in helping people reach their true potential. Click here to access our latest job’s

Learn and develop as a professional

In order to attain that promotion or new job then you need to push yourself out of your comfort zone, this means being willing to develop or learn new skills. Most new roles will require some level of learning, whether that is learning how to be a Manager or studying a new technique. Be willing to push yourself out of your comfort zone.

Don’t limit yourself

Our recruiters say that it is essential to believe in yourself and don’t limit your abilities. Most employers can tell if someone really believes that they can be successful in a new role compared to those that are not. Confidence in your own abilities can help you get that promotion or new role.

Help your career during this quarantine

Brush up on your soft skills

Emotional intelligence is rooted in them, business leaders swear by them, and they remain in high demand. I’m speaking of soft skills, those frequently misunderstood and undervalued skills that power career success. Earlier this year, LinkedIn released its annual Global Talent Trends 2019 report, which explores the four big trends fueling the future of the workplace. Topping the list? Soft skills.

This finding underscores a fundamental truth: At its core, business is about relationships. No matter your job function or title, to succeed, you must interact with other people. And those who find a way to combine their hard skills with soft skills create environments that empower and ignite their teams, delight their customers, and fuel sustainable growth.

Master time-management

Your ability to prioritize and focus your attention on tackling work projects is crucial. How and with whom you spend your time, and your productivity while doing so, demonstrate your focus and commitment to what—and who—matters most. When you master time-management, you’ll learn to say no, do, decide, delegate or delete tasks, batch routine tasks, eliminate distractions, embrace mono-tasking, get to know—and work—your own rhythms, and build in breaks to recharge.

Get creative

Creativity is the ability to perceive the world in new ways, to find hidden patterns, to make connections between seemingly disparate things, and to generate innovative solutions. When you’re creative, you’re able to turn new and imaginative ideas into reality. Business leaders agree that to cultivate your creativity, you should ask big questions, pay attention, be open-minded, set aside time to let your mind wander, and not be afraid to take risks.

Job Loss Happens…

Be More Than Prepared

Always have an up-to-date resume ready to send. You never know when an opportunity that is too good to pass up might come along. If you’re not on LinkedIn yet, create a LinkedIn Profile and start making connections who can help your job search.

Don’t Wait

If you are laid-off, file for unemployment benefits right away. You will most likely be able to file online or by phone. Waiting could delay your benefits check.

Get Help

Utilize free or inexpensive services that provide career counseling and job search assistance such as college career offices, state Department of Labor offices or your local public library. Many libraries provide workshops, programs, classes, computers and printers you can use, and other resources to help you with your job search.

 Work with CareerPathsNW

We are the Pacific Northwest’s leading recruiting agency, its a no cost service to the candidates and if you are in the market for a job, we can help connect you with the right jobs with companies that are looking for individuals like you. Come see us for a free consultation.

Industries still hiring during the Corona Outbreak

Pandemic job insecurity comes with a silver lining: It’s better to see the ax now rather than later, because your chances of landing a new gig are highest right now, at least in certain industries. Here’s where to look:

Shipping and delivery companies: Amazon is hiring 100,000 workers, mostly for fulfillment and delivery, and some UPS hubs are hiring as well, although—fair warning—both companies are facing criticism over employee safety. Some couriers are also hiring.

Online learning companies: Now that over 30 million children are out of school, it’s boom time for online schools, which are swiftly expanding capacity. Outschool is hiring thousands of teachers to meet demand.

Grocery stores and delivery services: Grocery stores are your friends. Major chains such as Kroger, Meijer, and Safeway are hiring in-store shelf stockers and delivery staff; ditto for regional chains such as Raley’s. Grocery delivery services and apps such as Instacart are also hiring.

Remote meeting and communication companies: Zoom is hiring, as are Slack and Microsoft Teams.

Working families: Many working parents are now forced to hire for many months of childcare, now that California’s governor announced that schools likely won’t open before fall. If kidcare is your jam, consider offering cheap, flexible options. Snap up these gigs in the next couple weeks.

Think broadly: There is no shame in a paying job of any kind, especially during a pandemic. And remember this is an excellent time to skill up. Want to learn to code? Or take a crack at the GRE? Or pick up an online credential? ‘Tis the season.

Tips for a Job Search during the Corona Recession

The Corona Virus has put everyone on the back-foot, if you are already unemployed or have lost your hours and feel like your job is in trouble you will can follow the following tips to kickstart your Job Search.

Pick and Choose Your Targets

It’s important to put your time and energy into opportunities that you’re the most interested in and that have the best chance of coming to fruition. Pick a few companies you’re interested in and pursue them, whether they have current openings or not.

Concentrate on Growth Industries

Focusing on growth industries and areas. And any job that alleviates pain is recession-proof. Similarly, the National Guard, Border Patrol, homeland security and the defense industry in general will continue to thrive as the next stage in the war on terror continues.

Work Your Network

Flip through your Rolodex or business social media contacts and let them know you’re looking.

Take a Temporary Position

Consider interim staffing to fill a temporary slot for work that needs to be done despite the economy, or temp with a company that interests you. Many of these options pay well and can carry the burden of bill-paying until a permanent position comes along.

Sweat the Small Stuff

Don’t forget the personal touches,  don’t use a template cover letter — make sure each letter addresses specific skills or qualities the company is looking for. And always send a thank-you note or email after the interview. Use this correspondence as an opportunity to revisit weak areas of your interview.

Stay Positive

The most important thing when searching for a job in these tough economic times is to retain a positive attitude, even in a job market with 10 percent unemployment, there’s 90 percent employment.

Struggling to find a great job in a bad economy can be a drag, but undertaking even a few of these tips will improve your chances of landing a gig.

Letter from the CEO

The COVID-19 pandemic will stand out in history as a world-changing event. In the course of just one month the economy has been affected, the way we conduct everyday life, business and operate within our communities has all dramatically changed. Our hearts and hats go off to the governments, healthcare professionals and first line responders around the world collectively who are all striving to help combat the spread of this disease.

In the face of this unprecedented situation, CareerPaths NW remains committed to doing what’s right for our employees, our clients, their customers, and the communities where we operate. We are continuously working to take steps to protect our extended families, keep business going, and constantly monitoring the situation and adjusting to any changes in policy and or other restrictions.

As a recruiting firm our role in this time is even more critical, and we pride ourselves on being a resource that can provide hope as well as consulting with our clients on best practices to help offset the challenges we all face during this time period. While we cannot promise jobs or placements for everyone, we will continue to advise and guide on how to best navigate these uncharted waters.

If we can be a resource in any way, please feel free to give us a call or email and we will do all that we can to help.

We are in this together, and we will not only survive but THRIVE and overcome. Together!

Warmest regards,
Andre’ Taylor
C.E.O.

Seattle Hobbies that could land you a job

In a competitive workplace, your resume needs to stand out enough to get you through the front door.  So once you’ve polished up your skills and experience, put that “Hobbies” line on your resume to work for you. Here are a few extracurricular interests that can highlight admirable job skills.

Rock Climbing

What it shows: Decisiveness, problem solving, and interpersonal skills
Adrenaline-pumping activities like rock climbing and whitewater rafting say a lot about personality — and look especially good for candidates pursuing jobs that involve heavy decision making and leadership skills. If you’re trying to show that you can make quick decisions under heavy pressure, support those claims with evidence.

Launching a Club

What it shows: Initiative, management skills, and passion

You can skip listing most club memberships, say career experts. But if you actually founded a local juggling (or running, hiking, ukulele playing, etc.) club, be sure to include it — because it shows impressive initiative and management skills.

Seattle recruiters look for any pursuit in achieving a level of excellence. Of course, starting a club just because you think it will look good on your resume isn’t enough. People will see right through that, You have to have a passion for it, and pursue it at a high level — that’s the trick.”

Hosting Online Discussions

What it shows: Leadership, reliability, and a strong understanding of social media

Leading regular Twitter chats (or other online discussion groups) combines several talents that recruiters are on the lookout for: organizational, networking, and technical skills, as well as the ability to develop and maintain a social media following. It shows genuine passion and leadership and excellence; those are skills that hiring managers love.”

Volunteering Your Talents

What it shows: Practical skills, generosity, and confidence

Have you done any volunteer work that is related to your profession? Applying your career skills for the greater good can say a lot to Seattle hiring managers.

“Examples would be like managing financials or financial records for a charitable organization, overseeing an event, production or program, or establishing or directing a fundraiser. This type of volunteer work can help demonstrate your skills, experience, or expertise, as well as your commitment to community.

Want to make forward progress in your career?

Being ambitious in your career doesn’t mean you need to be a ruthless workaholic who uses other people to climb the ladder; it means being curious, hardworking, excited, and open to new opportunities, even when you least expect them. It means taking an active role in your own process—whether that’s going out on a limb to ask a senior staff member to coffee; proactively seeking feedback; or intentionally surrounding yourself with industrious coworkers you admire. Whether you’re just starting out in the real world or looking for some guidance through a professional rut, read these simple, yet effective career-building strategies to help you meet the right people, expand your horizons, and ultimately land—and thrive—on the right career path for you.

Talk to Someone With the Job You Want

Are you new to the job market or looking to make a career 180? Don’t underestimate the power of an informal informational interview. Find someone in the occupation to speak with, pick their brain: Ask what the job entails, what skills are needed, what level of education you’ll need, what professional organization you should join—and even if you can shadow the person at work for a day. Then take steps to qualify yourself for the position, and make sure the person in charge of hiring—whether you’re applying for a new job or for a promotion—knows you’ve taken them.

Find the Upsides of Office Politics

Whether you want to be or not, you’re in the game, this doesn’t mean you should be petty or step on people’s toes; instead, make an effort to really absorb what’s going on around you, learn who’s in charge of what, and understand how work gets done in the organization. Build genuine relationships with others by being a team player, being professional, and avoiding gossip, and unprofessional outbursts.

Take Advantage of Your Connections

Sometimes it is about who you know—and that shouldn’t be a bad thing. Think about the person who’s hiring for your dream job. Do you know someone who might know them? Or someone who knows someone? Ask around: You want somebody to put in a good word for you. It’s not cheating, it’s smart and how so many great connections and successful careers get started.