Is your career stuck?

Research the occupations that appeal to you most.

Use online and educational resources to learn more about each profession. Although a quick Google search will most likely give you some basic information, it can be helpful to visit professional organizations’ websites for further insights. In addition, you could find out who the thought leaders are in each field and look for articles, interviews and videos featuring them. Finally, narrow your list down to one occupation you want to pursue.

Determine if you need to retrain. Depending on your transferable skills and experience, you may have to get additional education. If so, work out a plan that will allow you to do so while you’re still working your current job.

Research industries and companies you’re interested in. No matter how much you like a job description, it’s important to be aware that the industry you’re in and the company you work at play a large role in your happiness. Spend some time finding out about various relevant industries, as well as which companies have the kind of projects and ethos you’re looking for.

And Lastly….

Work with a recruiter. A recruiter can help you find jobs that are a good match for your skills and preferences while still taking your experience into account. Moreover, recruiters hear about jobs before they’re posted on job boards and can help get your résumé on the right desks.

Are you aware of opportunities around you?

Look For Active Growing Companies

Keep an eye out for companies in your community that is announcing expansion or increased profitability, like opening a new branch or office, or their profits last year went up dramatically.

These companies are always looking for more good people. Every business owner knows the key to growth is to hire good people. The more good people you can hire, the faster you can grow and the more profits you can make.

Growing companies offer lots of opportunities and will pay well for the right skills, especially if you’re the one who has them.

Find New Product Releases

Whenever a company is expanding its products or services there will be job opportunities to sell, distribute, service, and install the product. Additionally, there will be jobs handling administration and details associated with the product.

My suggestion is to create a “watch list” of popular companies in your area or companies you are personally a fan of their products. If you frequently check these companies LinkedIn, career pages, and set up job alerts on third party sites, you will likely find out about the positions before others on the market.

Then, when it comes time for hiring, you will be one step ahead of the competition.

Working from home? cultivate some good habits.

Maintain a live schedule.

Since you’re not seeing your colleagues every day, it’s hard to stay updated on their whereabouts and the goings-on of the company. Employees working from home need to make it a point to have an active schedule. By keeping constant updates and reminders, it is easy to stay abreast of what the rest of the team is doing and not get behind or miss deadlines. There are many tools and apps that keep track of moving parts of assignments, meetings, days when other employees are in the office and more, he added.

Use apps like Slack  or Teams

Create a physical workspace.

Just because you’re working at home or in your pajamas doesn’t mean you can’t create a productive environment. Setting up a particular space in the home that is only for work, such as an office or a particular spot at a dining room table, it is a clear message to the employees and anyone around them that they are in work mode. It can be as simple as setting up a desk with notepads and pens or clearing some space at your kitchen table rather than lounging on the couch or in bed. Make sure you have zero distractions: Turn off your TV, put on some bright lights, keep your phone on silent unless it’s needed for work, etc.

Create a virtual workspace.

A virtual workspace is just as important as a physical one. Rather than isolating yourself from your colleagues, initiate video calls and group messages. Create a space for all online employees to meet frequently, having video conferences or conference calls builds community within a team and makes sure no one feels left out. Make sure everyone receives an equal amount of attention, and that no one feels out of the loop. When managing workers who are not in the office daily, it is important that supervisors provide them with all the information necessary.

Don’t come in only when you have a reason.

While it’s tempting to stay at home as much as possible, don’t save in-office days only for required meetings, the root of true innovation very often lies in chance meetings. Organize lunches or after-work dinners, and push yourself to come in when others are around – even if your agenda is free that day. This will enable these face-to-face meetings and entice others to the office. Remote work could be a bad practice, however, if you make the effort to show up often and connect with colleagues, you’ll find the practice more beneficial than problematic.

 

Tips to survive the Covid Blues

2020 has been an epic year for all the wrong reasons and things are bleak and circumstances have led you to think about a  new career or a new job.

Maintain your focus.

If you’re about to start a new job or career, it’s time to get laser-focused. What type of work do you want to do? What types of projects do you want to work on? Get clear on what your dream career looks like and deprioritize anything that’s not on your goal list.

Do your research.

Thanks to Google (and Bing and Yahoo) job searching resources are at our fingertips! Interested in working at a specific company? Check out Glassdoor to see what employees are saying about it. Get informed–it might even lead you to a new company (or title) you haven’t heard of before.

Remove distractions.

Learning something new or doing research to change careers can be daunting, so always aim to work in environments that allow you to be the most productive.

Learn the fundamentals of the industry.

If you’re making the leap into a completely new field, do your best to learn the basics. Find out what the typical job titles and roles consist of and learn about the types of career path options you could take. Start with the entry level and work your way up to see what it would take to become a manager or director in your respective field.

Tap into your network.

Ready to become a software engineer and know a friend (or a friend of a friend) who is one? Reach out to them! Buy them coffee, find out about their process, dig into what they wish they knew when they got started.  Even if you’ve had three jobs before making the switch, there’s always room to learn more. Worst case, you’ll get some insider info. Best case––they might be the contact that helps you nab your next role.

Job Loss Happens…

Be More Than Prepared

Always have an up-to-date resume ready to send. You never know when an opportunity that is too good to pass up might come along. If you’re not on LinkedIn yet, create a LinkedIn Profile and start making connections who can help your job search.

Don’t Wait

If you are laid-off, file for unemployment benefits right away. You will most likely be able to file online or by phone. Waiting could delay your benefits check.

Get Help

Utilize free or inexpensive services that provide career counseling and job search assistance such as college career offices, state Department of Labor offices or your local public library. Many libraries provide workshops, programs, classes, computers and printers you can use, and other resources to help you with your job search.

 Work with CareerPathsNW

We are the Pacific Northwest’s leading recruiting agency, its a no cost service to the candidates and if you are in the market for a job, we can help connect you with the right jobs with companies that are looking for individuals like you. Come see us for a free consultation.

Seattle Hobbies that could land you a job

In a competitive workplace, your resume needs to stand out enough to get you through the front door.  So once you’ve polished up your skills and experience, put that “Hobbies” line on your resume to work for you. Here are a few extracurricular interests that can highlight admirable job skills.

Rock Climbing

What it shows: Decisiveness, problem solving, and interpersonal skills
Adrenaline-pumping activities like rock climbing and whitewater rafting say a lot about personality — and look especially good for candidates pursuing jobs that involve heavy decision making and leadership skills. If you’re trying to show that you can make quick decisions under heavy pressure, support those claims with evidence.

Launching a Club

What it shows: Initiative, management skills, and passion

You can skip listing most club memberships, say career experts. But if you actually founded a local juggling (or running, hiking, ukulele playing, etc.) club, be sure to include it — because it shows impressive initiative and management skills.

Seattle recruiters look for any pursuit in achieving a level of excellence. Of course, starting a club just because you think it will look good on your resume isn’t enough. People will see right through that, You have to have a passion for it, and pursue it at a high level — that’s the trick.”

Hosting Online Discussions

What it shows: Leadership, reliability, and a strong understanding of social media

Leading regular Twitter chats (or other online discussion groups) combines several talents that recruiters are on the lookout for: organizational, networking, and technical skills, as well as the ability to develop and maintain a social media following. It shows genuine passion and leadership and excellence; those are skills that hiring managers love.”

Volunteering Your Talents

What it shows: Practical skills, generosity, and confidence

Have you done any volunteer work that is related to your profession? Applying your career skills for the greater good can say a lot to Seattle hiring managers.

“Examples would be like managing financials or financial records for a charitable organization, overseeing an event, production or program, or establishing or directing a fundraiser. This type of volunteer work can help demonstrate your skills, experience, or expertise, as well as your commitment to community.

Career Advice for Women

Networking Horizontally:

Networking is one of the most crucial parts of building a career or business. One ignored part of networking that is extremely useful is Horizontal Networking. Networking doesn’t always mean attending events or trying to connect with someone you admire. Networking can also mean getting close with the people in the trenches with you as you evolve in your career. Over the years, those people will move on to other positions and you never know how you can help each other in the future.

Passion:

The most important quality to have to move ahead in your career is to show passion in every job you have. Even if you are not in your dream job, you need to put your best foot forward.  You never know who you will meet or who will end up shaping your future. Remember that your career or business is a marathon, not a sprint.  Do not try to be an overnight success or a one-hit wonder. Slow and steady wins the race. Take your time to develop the skills you need. No one expects you to know everything out of the gate.

Be Bold:

Be audacious! Treat your career as an exciting story, one you want to tell, each chapter adding new experiences and capabilities to your professional and life journey. Be passionate, show up and do what you love. Push other women forward, too.

Instinct:

Go with your gut. Never doubt it. Nurture it. Make it stronger. Make listening to it part of your self-care routine. It will never lead you astray. Even if it tells you something you don’t want to hear, trust that voice; it will guide you to the right destination. If it recommends a career transition, a new job or circle of friends, trust it blindly. Make that a foundation you can always turn to in moments of doubt or on hard days.

 

Cloud-Base Your Career Materials

You’re scrolling through job listings over your lunch break, and suddenly you see your dream job.

Naturally, you want to apply immediately—but then you realize your career materials are all on a zip drive you left at home. And that means you’ll have to wait until you’re back home before you can fill out an application.

Cut your response time
While there’s nothing wrong with keeping your career materials on a zip at home, it can be inconvenient and delay your application. If, on the other hand, you store your career materials in the cloud, then you have everything ready to go (give or take a couple of cover letter tweaks) and can respond to an interesting job listing as soon as you have a few minutes to yourself.

Preparing your career materials
We all know that you should tailor your resumé and cover letter to the position you want. Depending on how broad your job search is, that can mean focusing on different strengths.

For example, if you’re a PR professional, you might be interested in working for a start-up—but maybe you’d also consider a position with one of the country’s top PR agencies. To maximize the efficiency of using the cloud, prepare resumés and cover letters for each of the positions you’d consider. Remember: if something else comes along, you can always tweak your materials later.

Uploading your career materials to the cloud

You can use a cloud storage provider to simply store the documents. The best providers with free options are DropBoxGoogle Drive and OneDrive (free with Windows). From here, you can share your documents with others, or send them along as attachments to emails.

Evolution is an necessary to upgrade your career.

Continue Learning and Training  

Once you know what you want to do, find out which credentials are either necessary or beneficial for your career evolution. While some positions might require credentials, others may consider certain certifications as a ‘Nice to Have’—which means you’ll get a leg up if you have it.

Continuing your training and education is paramount, especially in the tech industry. In fact, more than 55 percent of developers seek out training to meet current or upcoming needs or to advance their careers, according to the 2017 Developer Learning Survey. In this case, for example with a software engineer, it may be required that you have certain credentials thanks to the fast-evolving world of technology.

In other cases, like the example of moving from sales to marketing, a credential you likely don’t need is a Google Analytics Certification. However, it will look great on your resume and is free to take. Not to mention, knowing how to navigate Google Analytics is a skill most marketers need to have to be successful, whether you learn on the job or come into a new position with the knowledge already.

Just starting your career?

Set clear goals

The very first step is goal determination: What exactly does “career” mean for you? Is this associated with a certain amount of money? Do you want to reach a particular position?

Only when you have a clear idea of what it means for you to “make a career” can you also work towards this purpose. Many people do not take the time to become aware of their own career goals consciously and systematically. Do it! Write down for yourself what you want to achieve and why you want to achieve it. Imagine what it will be like when you reach your destination. Work out a very concrete and detailed plan of action to get you where you want to go. Take your career goal actively in hand.

Become aware of what your career may cost

If you know what you want to achieve, you should also consider what you are willing to pay for it. Many people’s careers are at the cost of their relationship with their life partner, or they neglect their health, free time, and other things that make up their quality of life. But if you want to stay fit, you need to make sure you’re fine – physically, mentally and mentally. So you should be clear in advance about what you may and may not cost your career. Only then can you make appropriate decisions in your professional life. Sometimes a career leap is not worth it if you have to give too much of what is important to you.

Take your time to self-reflection

Time and time again to pause and think

  • what you do exactly
  • how useful that is,
  • whether it brings you to where you want to go and
  • maybe that will be easier too.

Especially when you are very eager to achieve a goal, in many cases takes over a kind of inner “autopilot” and controls our behavior. Such automatic ways of thinking and behaving should be discovered and questioned as soon as possible. Otherwise, you can easily find a way that does not take you where you want to go.