Network with Everyone

Network With Everyone — Not Just the Bigwigs

I think the most effective networking includes the informal kind which happens in daily life — at your kid’s soccer game, at the dentist’s office, at parties, etc. If someone says, ‘What do you do for work?’ you can say something like ‘I’m a project manager at a large industrial manufacturer but I’m looking to make a move to XYZ, do you know anyone in that industry?’ It may smack of the ‘putting it out into the universe’ kind of advice but you honestly never know who will have a connection for you, so I’m a firm believer in working any and all angles…

Bellevue Career Tips

“Diversify your skill set.”

It’s good to master your usual set of skills, but don’t get stagnant. Continue to develop your love of learning. If your job has tuition reimbursement perks, take advantage of it! Set out to learn a new skill. If you’re worried about time, it’s not about becoming a full-time student all over again. Take a couple courses at a time, earn some new certifications — become a wearer of many hats. It will set yourself apart professionally and who knows? It may help place you on the fast-track to your next promotion.

Get Help

Utilize free or inexpensive services that provide career counseling and job search assistance such as college career offices, state Department of Labor offices or your local public library. Many libraries provide workshops, programs, classes, computers and printers you can use, and other resources to help you with your job search. Here’s more on getting job search help at the library.

Questions to ask at the interview

There are many questions you can ask at your interview, these are pertinent to your performance.

Understanding how your potential new manager will measure your success is key in both understanding the company priorities, as well as their managerial style.

  1. What are the most important things you’d like to see someone accomplish in the first 30, 60, and 90 days on the job
  2. What are the performance expectations of this position over the first 12 months?
  3. What is the performance review process like here? How often would I be formally reviewed?
  4. What metrics or goals will my performance be evaluated against?

Going to a networking event?

You are going to need a few conversation starters…

“What do you think about [insert relevant topic germane to the event or person here]?”

“Wow, I just can’t believe all the crazy news headlines today. What a week!”

“Any chance you read the news today? I missed it, and I’m dying to know what’s happening with [insert news topic here].”

“So, was it a pain for you to get here?” The mode of transportation and location in the city are always on peoples’ minds.

“Did you catch the game last night?” It’s a classic, but it’s a classic for a reason.

Numbers, numbers and more numbers…

Putting together a resume? Give ’Em the Numbers

Use as many facts, figures, and numbers as you can in your bullet points. How many people were impacted by your work? By what percentage did you exceed your goals? By quantifying your accomplishments, you really allow the hiring manager to picture the level of work or responsibility you needed to achieve them.

Kicking it in reverse…

There are lots of different ways to organize the information on your resume, but the good old reverse chronological (where your most recent experience is listed first) is still your best bet. Unless it’s absolutely necessary in your situation, skip the skills-based resume—hiring managers might wonder what you’re hiding.

Seattle Job Search Tip #1

Create your online career brand. The job market is slowly evolving from a paradigm of job-seekers and employers using job boards to find each other to one in which employers find job-seekers online — whether through LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, or the job-seeker’s personal Website. Building your brand simply means showcasing your expertise and passion online where employers searching the Web could find it — and removing any unsavory — digital dirt — you can find. Learn more by reading one or more of these Personal Branding & Career Self-Marketing Tools for Job-Seekers and Career Activists.

Know Your Employment History

Be sure that you provide accurate information on your job applications and resume. Don’t guess as to where you worked and when. If you don’t remember the details, recreate your work history before you apply.

The most important thing is that you be truthful about all information you give to prospective employers. If you’re worried about what prior employers will say about you, proactively cultivate and supply positive recommendations to counter any potential negative feedback about your performance, or attitude.

Don’t complain about Mondays.

It’s like wearing a huge sign that says: “I hate my job and do not want to be here.” It’s fine to be looking forward to down time, but work time shouldn’t feel that bad. If you hate your career that much, you don’t have the right career.

Image Courtesy NBC