Seattle Job Search Tip #1

Create your online career brand. The job market is slowly evolving from a paradigm of job-seekers and employers using job boards to find each other to one in which employers find job-seekers online — whether through LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, or the job-seeker’s personal Website. Building your brand simply means showcasing your expertise and passion online where employers searching the Web could find it — and removing any unsavory — digital dirt — you can find. Learn more by reading one or more of these Personal Branding & Career Self-Marketing Tools for Job-Seekers and Career Activists.

Know Your Employment History

Be sure that you provide accurate information on your job applications and resume. Don’t guess as to where you worked and when. If you don’t remember the details, recreate your work history before you apply.

The most important thing is that you be truthful about all information you give to prospective employers. If you’re worried about what prior employers will say about you, proactively cultivate and supply positive recommendations to counter any potential negative feedback about your performance, or attitude.

Don’t complain about Mondays.

It’s like wearing a huge sign that says: “I hate my job and do not want to be here.” It’s fine to be looking forward to down time, but work time shouldn’t feel that bad. If you hate your career that much, you don’t have the right career.

Image Courtesy NBC

Excel at Phone Interviews in Seattle

Master the phone interview.

Your first interview will be a phone interview. It was the top method listed for conducting first interviews. But sadly, job seekers don’t feel as comfortable with phone interviews as they do with in-person interviews.

An HR screener will likely want you to walk him or her through your résumé. Be sure to have a copy of the same résumé; nearby during the interview. This part of the interview is usually a check-off item unless you give signals that there is more than meets the eye. “I was recruited,” “I left for greater responsibilities” or “I was part of a larger company reorganization” are all you need to say in most instances.

Any bullet point on your résumé might pique the curiosity of your interviewer. Be prepared to give more detail, but don’t take too much time on any one answer. After a few sentences, ask: “Is this what you were after, or would you like me to go in a different direction or provide greater detail?”

Do you know how to answer this Question?

Why are you looking (or why did you leave you last job)?

This should be a straightforward question to answer, but it can trip you up. Presumably you are looking for a new job (or any job) because you want to advance your career and get a position that allows you to grow as a person and an employee. It’s not a good idea to mention money here, it can make you sound mercenary. And if you are in the unfortunate situation of having been downsized, stay positive and be as brief as possible about it. If you were fired, you’ll need a good explanation. But once again, stay positive.

Create Your Position

Don’t just sit around waiting for your “dream job” to open. Study the industry or field that you’re looking to move into, and determine a company or two that you’d like to work for, Hockett says. “Then figure out their challenges through relationships or public information. With this, you can craft a solution for them that you can share directly or publically through a blog, for instance. The concept here is to get noticed through offering a solution to help them with no expectation of anything in return.”

Unemployment benefits

Don’t Wait. If you are laid-off, file for unemployment benefits right away. You will most likely be able to file online or by phone. Waiting could delay your benefits check.

Be more then prepared

Always have an up-to-date resume ready to send – even if you are not currently looking for work. You never know when an opportunity that is too good to pass up might come along. If you’re not on LinkedIn yet, create a LinkedIn Profile and start making connections who can help you job search.

Changing careers in Seattle here is a important tip

Make an Actionable Plan

Before you take a massive leap into a new career, take time to make an actionable plan. But don’t outline your five- or ten-year plan—while this is important, right now, you want to be thinking more immediate. Consider where you want to be this year, and what small, yet actionable steps you can take to achieve that objective.

For example, if want to make the move from salesperson to marketing specialist, there are a few actions you might take, including:

  • Shadow a marketing specialist at my current job this month.
  • Write a list of ways my sales skills applies to marketing so I can be prepared for interviews by next month.

Notice how each of these actions are specific and paired with a time limit.

Do you have a routine?

Set a routine.

Plenty of people complain about not having enough time to do all they need to do. Unfortunately, this is generally due to poor time management. While it may not match your ideal of the jet-setting entrepreneur lifestyle, the truth is that success rewards routine. Having a set routine for your day can be extremely helpful in allowing you to complete tasks and pursue high level achievements.

For instance, one common routine of successful people is to wake up early so that they can meditate, answer emails, or work out–basically, so that they can have some quiet time in the beginning of the day so that they can focus on work when it’s time to get going.