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Seattle Job search techniques

Create your online career brand. The job market is slowly evolving from a paradigm of job-seekers and employers using job boards to find each other to one in which employers find job-seekers online — whether through LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, or the job-seeker’s personal Website. Building your brand simply means showcasing your expertise and passion online where employers searching the Web could find it — and removing any unsavory — digital dirt — you can find.

Get organized. Before you start applying for jobs, going to job fairs, or interviewing with employers, take a moment to develop a system that works for you in organizing your job-search. A simple spreadsheet works best for many — and some online sites can even help keep your job-search organized.

Build, cultivate, and utilize your network of contacts. For the vast majority of job-seekers, a large and strong network of contacts — of people who know you and want to help you uncover job leads — results in more job opportunities. Networking — in person and online — is essential to your job-search success. Continually seek out new people to add to your network.

Attempt to complete several job-related goals daily. It’s a bit of a cliche now, but in all cliches there is truth — and that truth is that it takes a great deal of time and effort to find a new job. In a long job-search, it’s easy to get discouraged and distracted, but by focusing on achieving daily goals you can motivate yourself while also building a foundation for success.

Develop anecdotes and stories that showcase your skills. People remember stories over bullet points, so your goal should be developing a set of anecdotes you can use in networking and interviewing situations that clearly demonstrate your skills, accomplishments, and passion for your work. Using stories may also help you feel more comfortable talking about yourself.

Excel in the job interview. Research the employer and interviewers, know your route for getting to the interview, dress appropriately, arrive about 10 minutes early (to compose yourself, observe your settings, complete any paperwork), greet everyone warmly (from receptionist to hiring manager), use positive body language (firm handshake, strong eye contact, attentive posture, and friendly smile), confidently respond to interview questions, show enthusiasm, ask questions of the interviewer(s), and close the interview with appreciation and a request for information about next steps in the process.

Write thank-you notes after interviews to all interviewers. A quick note (by email and/or postal mail) of thanks that emphasizes your interest and fit with the job and employer will not get you the job offer, but it will help make you stand out from the majority of job-seekers who do not bother with this simple act of courtesy.

Continue following up with hiring managers. Your work is not done once the interview is complete or the thank-you note sent. Following up with the hiring manager regularly shows your interest and enthusiasm for the job. The key is doing so in a way that is professional while not making you sound pesky or needy.

 

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Relevant Work Experience for jobs in Lynnwood

Your dream job just got posted, and you’re super excited. There’s just one problem: You literally (and I actually mean literally) have zero relevant work experience. Whether you’re a career changer or a new grad with no internships under your belt, what can you actually put on your resume that makes you look as qualified as possible?

Fret not. There are a few different things you can include, as well as a couple of formatting tricks, that will help you present yourself in the best light possible.

Relevant and Transferable Skills

Most resumes will begin with relevant work experience (or education followed by relevant experience if you’re a new grad). That becomes a problem when relevant experience isn’t your strong suit. But rather than waste that prime real estate on your resume on things that will just confuse the recruiter, start instead with your relevant skills.

And don’t tell me you don’t have any. There must be a reason why you think you can do this job. You might have transferable abilities from a previous, unrelated experience, or maybe you developed skills while in school doing academic projects. In any case, if you’re a career changer, try tying all your skills together with a summary statement at the beginning of your resume. New grads, pop your skills section from the bottom of your resume to the spot right under your education.

Related Side and Academic Projects

Speaking of academic projects, it’s important to note that those are fair game and should definitely be included in your resume. The same goes for side projects that you’ve tackled outside of work or school. As long as you are clearly labeling this experience as project work, there is nothing preventing you from including it in your resume—and you absolutely should! Don’t make the assumption that only full-time, paid experiences can be on your resume.

One way to do this is to create a “Projects” section. Here, you would write about your project work the same way you would for work experience. Think about the experiences you’ve had that helped you realize your career interests. Was it a class project? Maybe you volunteered to help with something that ultimately sparked your newfound career goals—that’s experience that you can include on your resume under a “Projects” section. Format it similarly to help the recruiter understand that this, too, is valuable experience that should be evaluated when considering your candidacy for the position you are interested in.

An Enthusiastic and Specific Cover Letter

Okay, this isn’t technically part of your resume, but I am a firm believer of always coupling a resume with a strong cover letter. This is especially important if you have no relevant experience or a winding career path. This is true for career changers, too, but you also have a little bit more experience to work with. The cover letter is the perfect opportunity for you to connect the dots between the company’s needs and the skills you’ve built across your eclectic career. Be specific here. You want to really spell it out for hiring managers and explain why your non-traditional background might even be an asset, so that when they’re done with your letter they have a good understanding of why it makes sense for them to hire you.

Breaking into a new career is hard work, especially since many entry-level jobs are now asking for two or three years of experience. The trick to overcoming this is to really tease out those details like relevant skills and related side projects, and break out of the resume “rules” that are preventing you from including them front and center on your resume. Add on a riveting cover letter and, with a combination of networking and some luck, you’ll be sure to pique a hiring manager’s interest soon.

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Soft Skills you will need while looking for tech jobs in Seattle

If you’re looking for a top tech job, you’ll need to up your game. Sure, your field is in high demand and has a low supply of qualified professionals. And in my years helping technical recruiters attract tech talent, I’ve heard their most common complaint: there are just too many recruiters trying to get your attention. But I’ve also heard that businesses look for something that some tech workers just don’t have: soft skills.

Soft skills are things like collaboration, leadership, and critical thinking. Some companies even prioritize these skills more than pure tech talent when looking for their next great hire. In fact, a recent study that analyzed millions of job postings found that, even for highly technical jobs, 25 percent of the required skills were soft skills.

This means that you gain even more negotiating power with potential employers when you bring strong soft skills to the table. So if you want to gain the best opportunities, read on.

Be a Problem Solver

Some intel from the other side: One huge topic in the hiring world is how to find and hire critical thinkers. Critical thinking, intellectual curiosity, and problem-solving are a must as companies continue to blur the lines between business and IT.

Build this skill with empathetic thinking. Do you see common frustrations around you? What is the best way to solve these problems with technology? This is your opportunity to make an impact and create value for others.

Work on Your Communication

The professional business kind. This includes writing, listening, and presentation skills. Technology is no longer in a silo. It touches everything—and can improve everything, so everyone wants a piece of it.

That means that people from all departments will want solutions you have to offer, but you need to really listen if you want to understand their needs. And you won’t be able to share your solution with leadership if you have trouble speaking about and presenting your ideas.

Build your communication skills by practicing active listening and look for opportunities to speak up in meetings. The more you practice, the more you’ll improve.

Show You’re a People Person

Technology is getting more complex; and, thanks to the Internet of things, it’s becoming intertwined with more intricate products. This means many types of skills are brought to the table, which means many people—and a lot of chairs—will be around that table.

No matter how great you are at your technical skill set, if you can’t play nicely, then you won’t last long. Boost your collaboration credibility by seeking out opportunities to work in a group environment, especially cross-functional teams.

Always Ask Questions

Curiosity also leads to creativity and innovation. Why? Curious people aren’t content to just do things they way they’ve always been done, especially without a full understanding of the reason behind them and looking into ways they might be done better.

How to Show Off Your Soft Skills

Having soft skills only helps you if you can demonstrate that you have them. Here are some quick ways to show potential employers that you’re the full package.

  • Showcase projects you’ve worked on with videos and other types of rich media on your LinkedIn profile.
  • Explain a solution you’ve delivered in terms of the economic and stakeholder value it created for your company.
  • Clearly communicate that you understand the purpose behind your past projects, whether solving a customer problem or serving an internal business need.
  • Organize a group of colleagues who can verify that you’re a positive team player. Bonus points if you write one another recommendations to display on your personal websites or LinkedIn profiles.
  • Become a thought leader in your domain. Engage via social networks, local meet-ups, guest blogs, podcasts, and communities to inspire others.

If you think beyond coding, and learn to master the soft-skills code, you’re likely to land a gig at a dynamic company (or grow in your current position). After all, where would you rather be in 10 years? Sitting behind a screen… alone, or surrounded by a collaborative team to help you take projects to the next level.

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Learn valuable leadership skills on the job in Redmond

When you’re in college, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the unknowns of your future career. What if you never get a job? What if you get one and hate it? How are you going to build a career you love?

It’s all too easy to feel bewildered, running in circles trying to chase the perfect position. But at this stage in the game, a better approach is to think about the skills you want to gain. And what should be on your short list? Leadership skills.

Although there’s no one way to become a leader, entry-level job programs—structured programs for interns or new grads that help acclimate you to the working world—are designed to help you build the skills you’ll need to become the next Sheryl Sandberg or Elon Musk. And these fundamental leadership skills will help you no matter how your career unfolds!

Here are some awesome leadership qualities you can get through these types of programs, plus some real-life examples of young professionals who became leaders on the job.

1. Confidence

To build a thriving career, you need confidence—after all, believing in your own skills and abilities will help you take risks, tackle challenges, and put yourself out there for new opportunities. But that’s pretty hard to do when you’re starting your first job and you don’t even know where to make a cup of coffee.

Experts agree that the best way to build confidence is stepping out of your comfort zone and trying new things, both of which are actively encouraged in most entry-level job programs.

 

2. A Willingness to Ask for Help

As counterintuitive as it seems, humility is just as essential for leaders as confidence. As a leader, you won’t know everything so it’s important to be approachable and open to new ideas and ways of doing things. But, because many cultures emphasize self-reliance, entry-level professionals often start their first jobs feeling like they should already know everything. Organizations create these job programs specifically to help new professionals learn the ropes, offering built-in support to make it easy to learn how to learn.

3. Clear Communication

When you think of the quintessential leader, you probably imagine them standing at a podium. The most impressive leaders stand out because of their ability to communicate clearly and professionally, especially in front of groups.

If the mere thought of this makes your palms sweat, know that the best entry-level job programs will give you regular opportunities to get comfortable relating to and inspiring other people. You’ll be immersed in nearly every form of communication, from drafting everyday emails to leading big presentations in front of your peers.

4. Relationship Building

You’ve heard the term “networking” countless times before—and for good reason. The ability to build relationships across teams and pay grades is essential to becoming a leader. That said, reaching out to pick someone’s brain over coffee can feel artificial and forced—especially when you’re the low person on the totem pole. When companies successfully incorporate interns into their company culture, they create the ideal environment for people to build organic relationships.

5. Problem-Solving Skills

Every career has challenges that require serious problem-solving skills. Successful leaders don’t buckle under the weight—they overturn conventional thinking and come up with solutions.

But learning how to solve problems in a corporate environment, rather than the classroom, doesn’t come naturally to most of us, which is why the best entry-level programs give participants a range of experience solving problems in multiple situations.

In short? By participating in an entry-level job program, you cultivate leadership qualities that will serve you through your entire career. And the sooner you get started building these must-have skills, the quicker you’ll stand out as a young leader ready to tackle the next challenge.

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Non Verbal Cues for Successful Job interviews in Seattle

Practice good nonverbal communication

It’s about demonstrating confidence: standing straight, making eye contact and connecting with a firm handshake. That first nonverbal impression can be a great beginning — or quick ending — to your interview.

Dress for the job or company

Today’s casual dress codes do not give you permission to dress as “they” do when you interview. It is important to know what to wear to an interview and to be well-groomed. Whether you wear a suit or something less formal depends on the company culture and the position you are seeking. If possible, call to find out about the company dress code before the interview.

Listen

From the very beginning of the interview, your interviewer is giving you information, either directly or indirectly. If you are not hearing it, you are missing a major opportunity. Good communication skills include listening and letting the person know you heard what was said. Observe your interviewer, and match that style and pace.

Don’t talk too much 

Telling the interviewer more than he needs to know could be a fatal mistake. When you have not prepared ahead of time, you may ramble when answering interview questions, sometimes talking yourself right out of the job. Prepare for the interview by reading through the job posting, matching your skills with the position’s requirements and relating only that information.

Don’t be too familiar 

The interview is a professional meeting to talk business. This is not about making a new friend. Your level of familiarity should mimic the interviewer’s demeanor. It is important to bring energy and enthusiasm to the interview and to ask questions, but do not overstep your place as a candidate looking for a job.

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5 Free job search resources for job hunters in Bellevue

  1. Emurse.com: This is my favorite place to put a resume online, nothing more, nothing less.  Get your paper resume out and simply fill in the blanks.  Your online resume will be accessible from a URL like jones.emurse.com.
  2. LinkedIn.com: I usually only recommend upgrading for people who will be searching a lot and need to reach out to the people they find.  This might describe you, but if not, just get the free version.  YOU HAVE TO BE ON LINKEDIN.  PERIOD.
  3. Job-hunt.org: This site has a tone of stuff, and can be overwhelming to navigate, but two gems that you can’t miss.  First, Deb Dib’s article on LinkedIn for the executive job seeker.   Second, when to find a local face-to-face network meeting, go to Job-hunt.org and look to see what they have listed there.
  4. Twellow.com: Go to Twellow.com (which is like the “yellow pages of Twitter”) and search for people in your city, state, profession or industry.  You’ll find influencers who are probably well-networked – these are people who you want to develop relationships with.
  5. Indeed.com: Yup, a job board, but not for job board’s sake.  Use Indeed to do COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE RESEARCH.  Find out what companies are hiring, what your target companies competition is doing, what job titles look like, etc.  Ignore the idea of applying for jobs using job boards and think about this as a rich database research tool
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Remember these things when looking for a job

Invest in learning technical skills.

Job seekers self-reported that their top weakness was technical, computer or specialized skills. If this is your weak spot too, do something about it, because a quarter of employers rank these as top skills they are looking for. Take an online course to develop the skills you lack or need. More than 40 percent of job seekers have never invested in online training, but it is one way to improve your confidence and candidacy.

Show internships, not GPA.

If you are a recent graduate, you may agree with the job seekers in the survey who feel grades are the greatest indicator of your potential. But to employers, experience wins attention. So instead of focusing on your academic achievements, be sure to highlight your internships.

Get ready to take a test.

At some point during the interview process, you’ll likely be asked to complete an exercise, assessment or test of some sort. It is just another way to evaluate you. The study found that 57 percent of employers administer some exercise or challenge to job candidates, so don’t let this surprise you.

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Value of an inside referral

Find someone to refer you. You are missing out on job opportunities by not identifying someone inside the company to refer you for a job. While job boards are the primary source of hiring, 71 percent of HR professionals surveyed rated employee referrals as the best source for finding candidates, yet only 7 percent of job seekers surveyed viewed referrals as their top source for finding a job.

  • The average employee will have 150 contacts on social media networks – 100 employees means around 15,000 contacts (and possible candidates).
  • Employee referrals have the highest applicant to hire conversion rate – only 7% apply but this accounts for 40% of all hires.
  • Applicants hired from a referral begin their position quicker than applicants found via job boards and career sites (after 29 days compared with 39 days via job boards and 55 via career sites).
  • Referral hires have greater job satisfaction and stay longer at companies – 46% stay over 1 year, 45% over 2 years and 47% over 3 years.
  • Sales persons are the most hired position from employee referrals.
  • 67% of employers and recruiters said the recruiting process was shorter, and 51% said it was less to expensive to recruit via referrals.
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Weekend Motivation for job seekers in Bellevue

Persistence beats resistance.

Keep yourself motivated. Create a vision board if you need to, read inspiring quotes on your morning commute. Do whatever you need to, to keep going. Professionals have trudge through the valley to reach their mountain-top moment — you’re no exception. When things get hard, don’t cave under pressure. Use your struggles as an opportunity to learn and grow professionally. Try not to complain. It will only bring down both your morale as well as the other members of your team.

Diversify your skill set.

It’s good to master your usual set of skills, but don’t get stagnant. Continue to develop your love of learning. If your job has tuition reimbursement perks, take advantage of it! Set out to learn a new skill. If you’re worried about time, it’s not about becoming a full-time student all over again. Take a couple courses at a time, earn some new certifications — become a wearer of many hats. It will set yourself apart professionally and who knows? It may help place you on the fast-track to your next promotion.

Find out what you like doing best, and get someone to pay you for it.

Money. We all need it to survive. However, there’s a fine line between needing money and becoming obsessive over it. The more passionate you are about what you do, the faster success will follow you. It may not happen in the time frame you expect it to, but the more you focus on strengthening and edifying yourself as a leader in your specialty, the more likely the success of your work will follow. And as a bonus, you’ll enjoy waking up for work every day!

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